Appendix - Peter's Coronation Album



PETER'S CORONATION ALBUM

for more information about Royal Heraldry see


INTRODUCTION



THE PASSING OF KING-EMPEROR GEORGE VI


The stress of the war had taken its toll on the King's health exacerbated by his heavy smoking and subsequent development of lung cancer among other ailments including arteriosclerosis.
Princess Elizabeth, the heiress presumptive, took on more royal duties as her father's health deteriorated.
A planned tour of Australia and New Zealand was postponed after the King suffered an arterial blockage in his right leg, which was operated on in March 1949.
The delayed tour was re-organised with Princess Elizabeth and her husband, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, taking the place of the King and Queen. 
The King was well enough to open the Festival of Britain in May 1951, but on 23 September 1951, he underwent a pneumonectomy where his left lung was removed following the discovery of a malignant tumour.
At the State Opening of Parliament in November, the King's speech from the throne was read for him by the Lord Chancellor, Lord Simonds.
His 1951 Christmas broadcast was recorded in sections, and then edited together.
On 31 January 1952, despite advice from those close to him, he went to London Airport to see off Princess Elizabeth, who was going on her tour of Australia via Kenya.
On the morning of 6 February, George VI was discovered dead in bed at Sandringham House in Norfolk.

He had died from a coronary thrombosis in his sleep at the age of 56.
His daughter Elizabeth flew back to Britain from Kenya, as Queen Elizabeth II.
From 9 February for two days his coffin rested in St. Mary Magdalene Church, Sandringham, before lying in state at Westminster Hall from 11 February (see left).
His funeral took place at St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, on the 15th.
He was interred initially in the Royal Vault until transferred to the King George VI Memorial Chapel inside St. George's on 26 March 1969.


for more information about Royal Heraldry see

The Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II was the ceremony in which the newly ascended monarch, Elizabeth II, was crowned Queen of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Ceylon, and Pakistan, as well as taking on the role of Head of the Commonwealth. Elizabeth ascended the thrones of these countries upon the death of her father, King George VI on 6 February 1952, and was proclaimed queen by her various privy and executive councils shortly afterward.
The coronation, was held more than a year after the accession, on 2 June 1953; this followed the tradition that a festival such as a coronation was inappropriate during the period of mourning that followed the death of the preceding sovereign.
In the coronation ceremony itself, Elizabeth swore an oath to uphold the laws of her nations and, specifically for England, to govern the Church of England.


Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II
   
PREPARATIONS
  
For the one-day coronation ceremony, 16 months of preparation took place, with the first meeting of the Coronation Commission taking place in April 1952, under the chairmanship of the Queen's husband, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.
Though Elizabeth's grandmother Queen Mary died on 24 March, the dowager Queen had stated in her will that her death should not affect the planning of the coronation, and the event went ahead as scheduled.
Norman Hartnell was commissioned by the Queen to design the outfits for all the members of the Royal Family and especially the dress Elizabeth would wear at the coronation; Hartnell's design for the latter evolved through nine proposals, the final reached by his own research as well as numerous personal meetings with the Queen.
What resulted was a white silk dress embroidered with the floral emblems of the countries of the Commonwealth at the time: the Tudor rose of England, the Scots thistle, the Welsh leek, shamrocks for Northern Ireland, the wattle of Australia, the maple leaf of Canada, the New Zealand fern, South Africa's protea, two lotus flowers for India and Ceylon, and Pakistan's wheat, cotton, and jute; unknown to the Queen at the time of the gown's delivery, though, was the unique four-leaf clover embroidered on the dress' left side, where Elizabeth's hand would touch throughout the day.
Elizabeth, meanwhile, rehearsed for the upcoming day with her maids of honour, a sheet used in place of the velvet train and an arrangement of chairs standing in for the carriage.
So that she could become accustomed to its feel and weight, the Queen also wore the Imperial State Crown while she went about her daily business, sporting it at her desk, at tea, and while reading the newspaper.
Elizabeth took part in two full rehearsals at Westminster Abbey, on 22 and 29 May, though other sources assert that the Queen attended either "several" rehearsals or one.
Typically, the Duchess of Norfolk stood in for the Queen at rehearsals.




The Proclamation of the Coronation
by Norroy and Ulster King of Arms
Temple Bar - London
7th June 1952




First Meeting of the Court of Claims
members included
Lord Clarendon (Lord Chamberlain) - Lord Woolton (Lord President)
Lord Simonds (Lord Chancellor) - The Duke of Norfolk (Earl Marshal)
Lord Jowitt - Lord Goddard (Lord Chief Justice)




Members of the Royal School of Needlework - Kensington
embroidering the Queen's Coronation Robe




The remodelling of the Imperial State Crown




Preparation of Flags for use at the Coronation




Nine Walking Grooms
Coronation of Elizabeth II - June 1953




Four Royal Postillions
Coronation of Elizabeth II - June 1953




The Lion of England
for more information about Royal Heraldry see
THE ART OF HERALDRY

The Queen's Beasts are ten heraldic statues depicting the genealogy of Queen Elizabeth II.
They were commissioned by the British Ministry of Works from sculptor James Woodford (who was paid the sum of £2,750 for the work) to stand in front of the temporary annex to Westminster Abbey for the Queen's coronation in 1953.
The beasts are some six-foot (1.83 m) high, cast in plaster, and could not therefore be left in the open air.
The beasts are: the lion of England, the griffin of Edward III, the falcon of the Plantagenets, the black bull of Clarence, the yale of Beaufort, the white lion of Mortimer, the White Greyhound of Richmond, the red dragon of Wales, the unicorn of Scotland, and the white horse of Hanover.




The Queen's Beasts
Coronation Souvenir Wedgewood Plate
1953




The Royal Annexe and the Queen's Beasts
Westminster Abbey - London
Coronation 1953




Coronation Decorations in the Mall 
London 1953




Coronation Decorations - Picadilly Circus
London 1953





Work on the Royal Arms for the Royal Annexe to Westminster Abbey




New Uniforms being fitted for the Brigade of Guards




Bearskins being prepared for the Brigade of Guards




Halberds for the use of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard



Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II
   
CORONATION DAY




Her Majesty the Queen leaves Buckingham Palace for the journey to Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953

The Coronation ceremony of Elizabeth II followed a similar pattern to the coronations of the kings and queens before her, being held in Westminster Abbey, and involving the peerage and clergy, however, for the new Queen, several parts of the ceremony were markedly different.
The coronation of the Queen was the first ever to be televised (although the BBC Television Service had covered part of the procession from Westminster Abbey after her father's coronation in 1937), and was also the world's first major international event to be broadcast on television.
There had been considerable debate within the British Cabinet on the subject, with Prime Minister Winston Churchill against the idea; but, Elizabeth refused her British prime minister's advice on this matter and insisted the event take place before television cameras, as well as those filming with experimental 3-D technology.
Millions across Britain watched the coronation live, while, to make sure Canadians could see it on the same day, English Electric Canberras flew film of the ceremony across the Atlantic Ocean to be broadcast by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the first non-stop flights between the United Kingdom and the Canadian mainland. 
In Goose Bay, Newfoundland, the film was transferred to a Royal Canadian Air Force CF-100 jet fighter for the further trip to Montreal. In all, three such voyages were made as the coronation proceeded.




Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Phillip in the Coronation Coach on the way to Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953

Guests and officials passed in a procession before approximately three million spectators gathered in the streets of London, some having camped overnight in their spot to ensure a view of the monarch,[6] and others having access to specially built bleachers and scaffolding along the route.
For those not present to witness the event, more than 200 microphones were stationed along the path and in Westminster Abbey, with 750 commentators broadcasting descriptions in 39 languages; more than twenty million viewers around the world watched the coverage.
Military representation from throughout the Commonwealth marched in parade prior to the Queen's arrival, including the Canadian Coronation Contingent.
The procession included foreign royalty and heads of state riding to Westminster Abbey in various carriages, so many that volunteers ranging from wealthy businessmen to rural landowners were required to fill the insufficient ranks of regular footmen.
The first royal coach left Buckingham Palace and moved down The Mall, which was filled with flag-waving and cheering crowds.
It was followed by the Irish State Coach carrying Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, who wore the circlet of her crown bearing the Koh-i-Noor diamond.
Queen Elizabeth II proceeded through London from Buckingham Palace, through Trafalgar Square, and towards the abbey in the Gold State Coach.
Attached to the shoulders of her dress, the Queen wore the Robe of State, a 5.5 metre (6 yard) long, hand woven silk velvet cloak lined with Canadian ermine that required the assistance of the Queen's maids of honour — Lady Jane Vane-Tempest-Stewart, Lady Anne Coke, Lady Moyra Hamilton, Lady Mary Baillie-Hamilton, Lady Jane Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, Lady Rosemary Spencer-Churchill, and the Duchess of Devonshire — to carry.




.
The Coronation Coach
 London 2 June 1953

After being closed since the Queen's accession for coronation preparations, on Coronation Day, Westminster Abbey was at 6am opened to the approximately 8,000 guests invited from across the Commonwealth of Nations; more prominent individuals, such as members of the Queen's family and foreign royalty, the peers of the United Kingdom, heads of state, Members of Parliament from the Queen's various legislatures, and the like, arrived after 8:30 am.
From Canada came the Prime Minister, Louis St. Laurent, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario Louis Breithaupt and his premier, Leslie Frost, as well as Premier of Saskatchewan Tommy Douglas, Quebec Cabinet ministers Onésime Gagnon and John Samuel Bourque, Mayor of Toronto Allan A. Lamport, and Chief of the Squamish Nation Joe Mathias.
Tonga's Queen Tupou III was a guest, and was noted for her cheery demeanour even while riding in an open carriage through London in the rain.




Coronation Procession
Canadian Mounted Police at Piccadilly Circus - London
 London 2 June 1953




Queen Elizabeth II in the Coronation Coach
 London 2 June 1953




The Coronation Coach passes through Admiralty Arch
 London 2 June 1953

Preceding the Queen into Westminster Abbey was St. Edward's Crown, carried into the abbey by the Lord High Steward of England, then the Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope, who was flanked by two other peers, while the Archbishops and Bishops Assistant of the Church of England, in their copes and mitres, waited outside the Great West Door for the arrival of the Queen.




St Edward's Crown

for more information about Royal Heraldry and Regalia see
THE ART OF HERALDRY

The procession, which included the various High Commissioners of the Commonwealth carrying banners bearing the shields of the coats of arms of their respective nations, moved inside the abbey, up the central aisle and through the choir to the stage, as Psalms 122, 1–3, 6, and 7 were read and the choir sang out "Vivat Regina! Vivat Regina Elizabetha! Vivat! Vivat! Vivat!"
As Elizabeth prayed at and then sat herself on the Chair of Estate to the south of the altar, the Bishops carried in the religious paraphernalia — the bible, paten, and chalice — and the peers holding the coronation regalia handed it over to the Archbishop of Canterbury, who, in turn, passed them to the Dean of Westminster, Alan Campbell Don, to be placed on the altar.




St Edward's Crown is brought into Westminster Abbey
Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II - London 1953

for more information about Royal Heraldry Regalia see




Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Phillip leave the Coronation Coach at Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953




Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother enters Westminster Abbey
Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II - London 1953




Princess Margaret enters Westminster Abbey
Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II - London 1953




Her Majesty the Queen processing up the Nave of Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953




Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II - Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953





Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II - Seated on the Chair of Estate
Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953





Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother - Prince Charles - Princess Margaret
The Coronation of Elizabeth II - Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953




The Recognition
Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II
Westminster Abbey
 London 2 June 1953




Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's Coronation Bible
 London 2 June 1953





Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II Prepared for the Annointing
 London 2 June 1953






Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's Enthronement
 London 2 June 1953




Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's and her Bishops
 London 2 June 1953





Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's and her Bishops
 London 2 June 1953





The Homage of the Duke of kent to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
 London 2 June 1953





Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's Enthroned
 London 2 June 1953






Prince Philip makes homage to Her Majesty the Queen after the Crowning Ceremony
 London 2 June 1953

The Oath, Anointing and Hommage of the Peers followed and the Queen then exchanged St Edward's Crown for the Imperial State Crown, and then processed down the aisle of the Abbey, and returned to the Palace using the gilded Coronation Coach.
At the end of the proceedings the Royal Family repeatedly appeared on the Balcony of Buckingham palace, while the crowd cheered and the Royal Air Force flew a huge' fly-past'.




Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II leaves Westminster Cathedral
wearing the Imperial State Crown
 London 2 June 1953





Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II returns to Buckingham Palace
wearing the Imperial State Crown
 London 2 June 1953




Queen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family on the Balcony
Buckingham Palace - London 1953




Queen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family on the Balcony
Buckingham Palace - London 1953




Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II waving from the balcony of Buckingham Palace
 London 2 June 1953




Her Majesty the Queen, Prince Philip, Prince Charles and Princess Anne on the balcony of Buckingham Palace
 London 2 June 1953




Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and her Ladies in Waiting
 London 2 June 1953




Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip
 London 2 June 1953




Her Majesty the Queen wearing the Imperial State Crown




The Imperial State Crown
(as reset for Queen Elizabeth)
for more information about Royal Heraldry and Regalia see



 Portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II
   
THE CORONATION PROCESSION


The Model Coronation Coach
bought for the author in 1953




Mounted Chiefs of the Armed Forces
Admiralty Arch - the Coronation
London June 1953





The Coronation Coach approaches the Royal Annexe
Westminster Abbey
London June 1953





The Coronation Coach arrives at the Royal Annexe
Westminster Abbey
London June 1953



The Coronation Coach arrives at the Royal Annexe
Coronation of Elizabeth II
Westminster Abbey
London June 1953





Masses of troops in the Coronation procession
London June 1953




The Royal Navy manoeuvres through the gates
London June 1953





The Coronation Coach pass out of the Mall
London June 1953




Cheering crowds at Trafalgar Square
Coronation
London June 1953





The Coronation Coach pass through lines of cheering crowds
London June 1953




The Coronation Coach in the rain
Royal Airforce at the present and the crowds cheering
London June 1953




The Coronation Coach pass through Admiralty Arch
London June 1953




The Coronation Mug
bought for the author in 1953




Royal Cypher of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
for more information about Royal Heraldry see

2 comments:

  1. A marvellous blog ... thank you so much. I was born 6 days later ... but my Grandfather, the then (Lord) Bishop of Bradford was there.

    ReplyDelete
  2. O Deus optime
    Salvum nunc facito
    Regem nostrum;
    Sic laeta victoria
    Comes et gloria
    Salvum jam facito
    Tu dominum.

    God save our gracious Queen!
    Long live our noble Queen!
    God save the Queen!
    Send her victorious,
    Happy and glorious,
    Long to reign over us:
    God save The Queen!
    O Lord our God arise,
    Scatter her enemies,
    And make them fall:
    Confound their politics,
    Frustrate their knavish tricks,
    On Thee our hopes we fix:
    God save us all.
    Thy choicest gifts in store,
    On her be pleased to pour;
    Long may she reign:
    May she defend our laws,
    And ever give us cause
    To sing with heart and voice
    God save the Queen!

    ReplyDelete